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Uprise Adjustable Height Stand Up Desk Review

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Uprise Adjustable Height Stand Up Desk Review

An Affordable, Sturdy Standing Desk With A Variety Of Desktop Types
Overview
Reviewed By

The Editors

Review Summary

Ergoprise’s Uprise Standing Desk is a solid, mid-tier desk that stands at the crossroads of function and affordability. A quiet, sturdy base and a variety of table tops - including premium bamboo and hardwood - make this an attractive option for both standing-desk and treadmill-desk users.

Shipping

Ships in 7 - 9 business days via UPS Ground (48"-wide desks) or freight carrier

Warranty

5-year warranty on electronics and moving parts
Limited lifetime warranty on steel frame and table top

Lift Type

Electric

Transit Speed

1.7"/second up to 180 lbs.
1.4"/second up to 360 lbs.

Controller

2-button up/down controller standard
LED programmable height preset controller optional

Sizes Available

48"x24"
48”x30"
60”x30"
72”x30"

Maximum Height

51" including desk top

Weight Capacity

360 lbs.

Noise Level

42 dB

Where to Buy
Positives

Quiet, affordable, with a brawny lifting capacity and a solid warranty to back it up, the Uprise is both functional and affordable. Bamboo and hardwood tops are available for an additional cost

Negatives

At the time of writing, it only has a simple 2-button up/down controller. High pressure laminate quick-ship top is not impervious to moisture damage.

Experts' Rating
Stability
Safety
Reliability
Customer Experience
Quality and Aesthetics
Ergonomics
Innovation
Value
Suitability for Treadmill Desking
Bottom Line

Although we did not get to test the Uprise in our labs, we’re familiar with its TiMotion base and conventional HPL tabletops. The Uprise is a solid contender among the low- to mid-price sit-to-stand desk choices now on the market. Its TiMotion base is sturdy and quiet, and a more stable and reliable choice as compared to other Chinese-made electric bases we’ve reviewed. The range of desktop choices can accommodate almost any office budget and décor, though you’ll pay a premium for the nicest-looking bamboo and hardwood desktops. Its solid warranty and progressive shipping policies make it a good choice if you’re looking for a budget to mid-range height-adjustable desk. Its table top lacks the superior lamination technique of the Electra, but it’s still a smart buy for anyone shopping for a lower-cost electric desk.

Experts' Rating
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Review Details

[Editors’ Note: The following review is based on information provided by the manufacturer and our deep familiarity with its main components. If and when Ergoprise provides a unit for lab testing we will update this review with validation of the product’s specifications and any other noteworthy observations.]

In Standing Desks, Instability is the Mother of Invention

Ergoprise’s Uprise Stand Up Desk is a solid, mid-tier desk that stands at the crossroads of function and affordability. Its base is quiet, stable, and strong, and it comes with different desk top options that range from the economical to the premium, depending on the user’s taste and office requirements. It’s the spiritual successor to Ergoprise’s original adjustable height desk, the S2S, which used a lighter, less stable desk base.

With the Uprise, Ergoprise has separated itself from the millieu of vendors who still use a very common but lesser-quality Chinese-made base and veered off to join a smaller flock of manufacturers who’ve chosen to spend slightly more money on much better base components (still Chinese-made, but of higher quality). One of the most seasoned sellers in the market, Ergoprise has earned their experience through selling thousands of earlier-generation desks, and now they have parlayed their extensive product knowledge into their new Uprise. One thing we at really like about Ergoprise—and it shows in their choice of a more stable base platform—is that they also have more experience with treadmill desk users than most other manufacturers. Others tend to focus more narrowly on sitting to standing alone, where stability is still important but not as critical as when you’re moving at 1 – 2 mph.

For the Value Hunter

Ergoprise Uprise Stand Up DeskFor most people, a significant barrier to getting a new desk is price: No matter how you slice it, a good stand up desk is still a piece of furniture and a hefty investment (though not all expensive desks are necessarily of good quality). Budget-class desks have emerged that are priced at a fraction of the cost of more feature-heavy products. They may have simpler up/down controllers, without programmable height presets or overload sensors. They usually have shorter warranties as well, being made from cheaper materials in China, rather than in the US. And usually, they have lower performance scores and capacities—though that too isn’t always a surefire correlation between performance and price. In any event, these low-cost desks have met with varying success. Some, like the ThermoDesk Electra and UpTown, and now the Uprise as well, perform just as well as their pricier counterparts; others, like those built on the commonly-used Jiecang base, are known to suffer from reliability and stability issues.

A Stalwart Base

The Uprise Stand Up Desk is built on the TiMotion base, the same used in the ThermoDesk Electra desk and Synapse conference tables. The TiMotion is sturdier than other mid-tier desks bases made in China, even at its maximum height extension. Part of this can be attributed to the sheer weight of the desk: While other mid-tier desks use lightweight bases of 60 – 70 lbs., the TiMotion weighs in at a hefty 93 lbs., plenty of weight to anchor your desk in place. Stability is also bolstered by the desk’s particularly tall max height of 51 inches, which allows for more overlap between the telescoping leg segments, and less shakiness all around. The TiMotion base is not only heavy, it’s a heavy lifter. The Uprise desk can lift up to 360 pounds without breaking a sweat. Most users would be hard-pressed to find 360 lbs. worth of computers, mice, and keyboards, but a stand up desk’s weight capacity is nevertheless an important indicator for the durability and quality of its motors and actuators. Take the Ikea Bekant, which claims to have a 150 lb. weight capacity. This seemingly high stat belies the poor quality of its motors: Users have already begun to report on their Bekants failing in the field. The TiMotion’s heavy-duty weight rating makes us confident in its quality. In our tests of iMovR’s ThermoDesk Electra the TiMotion base continued to operate well with even higher loads, up to 490 lbs, before the overload-detecting current sensor killed power to the motors. Without a doubt, the TiMotion base is the heaviest lifter we’ve ever had in our test labs. The Uprise desk raises and lowers at a rate of 1.7” per second, edging out a lot of electric desks that typically move at 1.1” to 1.5” per second, though in our tests the lifting legs slow to 1.4″ per second if more than 180 lbs. is set atop the desk (the base manufacturer’s “rated lift capacity” is in fact 180 lbs). Still, with a typical load of tabletop, dual monitors, monitor arm, keyboard, CPU and a few desk accessories, we expect this desk’s height-adjustment mechanism to perform well. (You can read more on lift capacity in our article “Do Weight Ratings on Electric Desks Really Matter?“.)

This sturdy base also makes it suitable for use with an office treadmill. Stability (shakiness) is a paramount criterion for standing desks in general, and for treadmill desk applications especially—not only because the sway of the user’s body induces oscillations into the desk, but also because adding an extra 5”- 6” of deck height under the feet means the telescoping leg segments of the desk base have that much less overlap between them. That means that the higher your work surface, the more unstable your desk becomes. Generally speaking, any user over 5’9” tall should be concerned with stability, whether or not they use an under-desk treadmill. The Uprise desk’s 51” max height maintains more leg segment overlap at taller heights.

Reviewer’s Caveat: though the TL4 lifting actuators used in the Uprise are stock components from TiMotion, other frame elements have been customized by Ergoprise. Not having a test unit to compare against we can’t authoritatively speak to the differences in these components, which may be more cosmetic than functional, or simply aimed at cost reduction.

Quality Mid-Tier Features

Uprise Adjustable-Height Standing Desk With a Bamboo Top

Uprise Adjustable Height Standing Desk With a Bamboo Top

The Uprise is available with a bevy of configurable options. Available desktops include both the standard fare of high-pressure laminate (HPL) tops, as well as higher-priced premium tops. The HPL tops come in 11 wood grain and 6 solid color laminates and feature a PVC edge banding that is available in 15 color choices (which may not  always match the color and pattern of the desktop itself). HPL is a solidly mediocre desktop material due to those vinyl or PVC edges, which are susceptible to moisture damage and can peel away over time. Ergoprise also offers an Electro-Static Dissipative (ESD) desk top, perfect for electronics assembly and other workplaces where static electricity could be problematic, and a chemical-resistant Phenolic top that won’t be damaged by strong disinfectants. These alternative table tops have different color options from standard-top Uprise desks.

Customers willing to spend a little more can opt for a premium bamboo or hardwood top, which raises the price above that of a typical mid-tier sit-stand desk. A 30”x48” bamboo-topped Uprise, for example, costs $1,595. It’s a hefty uptick in price, but if you’re considering a GeekDesk for its bamboo top you’d stand to do better on the overall desk features and value with the more highly-rated Uprise, in our opinion.

The Uprise’s tops come in the typical variety of widths: 48”, 60”, and 72” widths, and notably 24”, 30”, and 36” depths. Note that the desk base is not really designed for 24” deep tabletops, so the feet will stick out beyond the tabletop both in front of and in back of the desk. That may be fine in open areas but if you put a 24”-deep desktop on this base and put it against the wall there will be a gap between the desktop and the wall, allowing your desk objects to freely “base jump” to the floor (forgive the pun).

In addition to these table top options, users can choose to upgrade the Uprise’s standard up/down controller to an LED Controller with programmable height presets. Advanced desk controllers allow you to set different heights for sitting, standing, and walking modalities, and are an immense convenience during your workday.

 
How Does the Uprise Stand Up Desk Compare to Other Mid-Tier Desks?

Uprise Stand Up Desk Optional Preset Controller

Optional Uprise Preset Controller

From our perspective from having tested so many sit-stand desks that are on the market today, there are “cheap” Chinese-made products and there are high-quality Chinese-made products. The Uprise, UpTown, and the Electra are examples of the latter, while other desks that are only slightly less expensive use inferior base components, which account for the difference you’ll see in our review ratings when comparing products based on Jiecang or Conset bases, e.g., versus TiMotion and other brands we’ve come to know and appreciate for their quality. The Jiecang base’s quality issues impact not only its reliability and durability, but its performance and stability as well.

Comparing the Uprise to the iMovR ThermoDesk Electra is more straightforward, as the bases are essentially the same (notwithstanding some customizations Ergoprise has made to some steel components like the feet and crossbars), leaving the material differences between them being only the tabletop offerings. Lacking from the list of the Uprise’s tabletop options are any 3D laminated options as would be found on all the iMovR desk products, including the Electra.

3D lamination is a newer, more advanced tabletop manufacturing process that results in a more durable and stable surface, ergo-contoured edging, impressive fully-laminated grommet holes, and an elegant appearance of being made from a solid piece of hardwood. 3D lamination costs less than the commonly-used HPL that’s been used for decades, but requires very expensive and very large machinery to fabricate, which few tabletop manufacturers yet possess. For example, Ergoprise sells their standard 30”x48” HPL desktop top for $220 versus iMovR’s price of $129 for the same-size 3D-laminated top. But if you’re looking for premium bamboo or other hardwood tops, or you need an extra-deep 36” desktop, you won’t find them at iMovR. So that sums up the trade-offs between these two top-choice products in the mid-tier electric category.

iMovR’s newest mid-tier desk, the UpTown offers a few additional advantages that set it apart from the Uprise and Electra. It features an advanced LED preset controller as standard, and users can select between a standard 0.75″-thick desk top and a thicker 1.125″-thick Select Top. The UpTown’s base can also support up to 360 lbs. and is designed to better accommodate your desk workload, thanks to its cantilevered “C-Leg” design, which positions the height adjusting actuators directly underneath the rear of your desk, where the most weight—your monitors, computer towers, and printers—tend to be. The UpTown also has the benefit of being the quietest desk on the market, with a noise signature just over 41 dB. Its built-in acceleration/deceleration dampening prevents the coffee-sloshing shudders that occur when a desk first starts moving. And for an ergonomic upgrade, you can choose the Omega Olympus desk, which pairs the UpTown base with an embedded SteadyType tray.

The Uprise is backed by a solid warranty: 5 years on the electronics and moving parts and a lifetime warranty on the steel and table top. It ships out 2-3 weeks from the time of order via freight carrier.

To view more adjustable height desks, visit our Adjustable Height Desks Comparison Review. Be sure to sign up for our monthly newsletter to get the latest in ergonomic- and active workplace product reviews.

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